Please see legal disclaimer and copyright information below

This Gazette was written exclusively for a client


Shipping Gazette

Latest maritime and legal news from Panama and around the world

Panama, June, 2009

Volume 1, Number 02

In this issue:

  1. Welcome

  2. The Lay Up Decision : What Panama is doing to alleviate the burden

  3. A quick review of the new General Law of Ports.

  4. Panama Marine Circulars Update

  5. Panama signs a “no arms on board” declaration at the UN

  6. Panama Canal Update

  7. Seatrade Asia

  8. IMO Update

1. WELCOME

Welcome to the second issue of the Shipping Gazette

During the last month the international shipping scene has witnessed a lot of welcome news, perhaps the best news being the release of the Hebei Two after being detained for 550 days. Also worth highlighting is the SeaTrade Asia exhibition.

In the financial arena the escalating number of ships being laid up is still alarming, but not less alarming is the latest number of newbuilding orders cancelled which according to an estimate by Norwegian class society DNV has risen to 564.

For shipowners looking for a solution within the lay up alternative, Panama has created a new registry for Laid up ships. It has already proven very popular, and below you will be able to read about the procedures, costs and alternatives offered. Our firm is working already with shipowners and if you need advice we are available to assist.

On the home front, Panama had a general election and by the time you read this, the new President of Panama, Mr. Ricardo Martinelli and his team will have taken office on July 1st, 2009. The transition period started back in May and the government has been working with the newly elected party to ensure that the transition is smooth. These changes should not affect the shipping registry, the Panama Canal and the ancillary maritime industries.

So welcome once again to Shipping Gazette; we aim to help you in your business and moreover, in your relationship with us as Panamanian lawyers and as a bridge between your ship/concerns and the Panamanian Registry.

Please feel free to share this newsletter with colleagues or anyone you believe would be interested in receiving it.

2. The Lay Up Decision

Sadly the global credit crisis has led the shipping industry to return to the days of laid-up ships. Usually the number of laid-up ships reflects the state of the world’s economy, and judging by the amount of ships laid up at the moment, we can see that history is repeating itself, recalling the 1980s where our industry suffered a similar crisis.

However, thanks to past experience there are some dusty manuals and recommendations from 20 years ago which were given to shipowners, and now all classification societies have issued an updated set of guidelines and recommendations for the shipowner to follow and ensure that their ships do not lose value, whether in hot, warm or cold laid up status.

The general recommendations issued are usually modified to suit a particular ship type or lay-up location. However, today’s vessels are more sophisticated and equipped on a more “high tech” basis than two decades ago, and there should be special regard for the specific requirements recommended by the equipment manufacturers. Most classification societies have departments specialised in assessing the procedure of laying up, and this is a fundamental guidance that must be followed by shipowners to ensure their ship is maintained in class, in good condition, and ready to be reactivated once the market stabilises and freight becomes more profitable.

In addition, laid-up ships will be subject to supplementary national port conditions that must be followed.

According to Norwegian class society and risk management consultancy, Det Norske Veritas, about 1,000 of the world's merchant vessels are laid up for lack of freight, and the number could swell to several thousand in the next few years.

The Panamanian Registry has acted quickly to ensure that shipowners have access to a resource for handling with the situation.

In February 2009 a new Lay Up registry was created, offering to shipowners not only a substantial reduction on tonnage tax and other flag charges, but also an opportunity to maintain the vessel registered with documentation in order to safeguard the ship as an asset; and furthermore safeguard any mortgage or financial agreement that the shipowner maintains with the financial institutions.

Basically the registry is for vessels already registered in Panama or for new vessels wishing to be registered under the Panama flag.

The registration under Lay Up regime is valid for one year and can be extended by a further year.

The procedure to register a vessel under the Lay up registry is as follows:

For existing vessels already registered in Panama:

  • Application form:

The application will be lodged by the Panamanian Resident Agent of the vessel . In the application it must be stated the exact date when the vessel ceased commercial operation and entered (or will enter) Lay up status and the exact location where the vessel will be laid up.

  • Affidavit from the owners:

The Affidavit should state that the vessel has been entered into lay up and it would not sailed or would not be moved while having the special lay up licence that Panama will be issuing to the ship.

  • Lay Up declaration by the Classification Society or RO of the vessel and/or a letter from the Harbour Master:

These documents should state the status of Laid up of the vessel including the date and location.

  • Any other document that the Flag State may register as proof of Lay up and ownership of the vessel.

All documents must be notarised and legalised by a Panamanian Consul or via Apostilled.

For new vessels wishing to be registered in Panama:

Aside from those requisites above listed, the interested party must present the following documents which must be notarised and legalised by a Panamanian Consul or via Apostille to wit:,Power of Attorney in favour of a Panamanian lawyer or law firm to act as Resident Agent of the vessel.

  • Bill of sale and its Acceptance or any other document as proof of ownership of the vessel, e.g.: certificate of ownership from the previous flag.
  • Deletion Certificate from the previous flag.

Fiscal Benefits & Tax Savings

  • No registration Fees

For those vessels applying for first registration under Panama flag under the Lay Up registry there is no charge for registration fees.

  • No Inspection Tax
  • No Accident & Conference Tax.

3. The New General Law of Ports of Panama (Law No.56 of 6th August, 2008):

In this issue we would like to draw our attention to the new General Law of Ports which replaces the regulations of concessions to port activities previously regulated by Law 42 of 1974 which entered into force last August 7th, 2008.

In the past, rights for the exploitation of port activities were provided by the government under a very general concessions law. The port sector in Panama has seen an enormous growth in recent years with the privatization of the main Panamanian ports of the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Along came other main international port companies setting up their business on both coasts. Panama’s economic growth has demanded bigger port capacity and at the moment there are several port projects under consideration.

Once for all, the new General Law of Ports defines the rules of the game applicable to all parties, thus avoiding seeing the common situations of older operating ports requesting equivalencies for newer concessions provided to ports entering the Panamanian market or vice-versa.

The main objectives of the General Law of Ports are to establish regulatory norms relating to the general operation and activity of ports and maritime installations that presently exist or which will exist in the future in the territory or the Republic of Panama, to regulate the application of general tariffs and fiscal regime over cargo movement and to provide a guideline for the general use of property given by concessions and the provision of public or private maritime services.

The General Law of Ports not only seeks to clarify rights and obligations of main port operators but also provide a clear and efficient procedure to obtain the necessary concession or contract-laws to operate ports in Panama and the issuance of operations licenses to private companies or persons which will provide accessory maritime services in these ports. It will also define the rules of engagement applicable to all existing and future parties involved with port activities, thus creating a level playing field for everybody. In any event, the new law will respect and honour all contract laws relating to port concessions and/or operation licenses, which have been provided by the Panamanian government to port operators, private persons or companies respectively prior to the enactment of the new law.

The legislation seeks not only to maintain Panama’s leadership in transhipment in the region, but also offers opportunities to investors to base their activities in Panama and reach new markets, thus expanding Panama’s present port capacity and container movements to compete with international maritime centres principally in Asia.

In conclusion, the new port legislation will:

a. Create a level playing field to all present and future port operators;

b. establish the parameters of tariffs to be applied by the government to concessions and operation licenses provided to companies and private persons;

c. respect the legal status of the presently provided contract laws to port operators and operation licenses to companies or private persons by the Government of Panama;

d. conform a modern and efficient national port regulation system which will guarantee the due coordination between operators, service suppliers and the state;

e. endorse competitiveness between businesses that form part of the commercial, transport and logistics activity that supply port and cargo movement; and

f. promote the economic and social development of the country.

4. Panama Marine Circulars Update

Recently the Panama Maritime Authority has published new circulars on line:

Merchant Marine Circular No. 200,

Revision of the IBC/BCH Code and MARPOL 73/78 Annex II

February, 2009

http://segumar.com/HTML%20Merchant%20Marine%20Circulars/200.pdf

Merchant Marine Circular No. 201

Correction of Deficiencies found in ASI Inspections

February, 2009

http://segumar.com/HTML%20Merchant%20Marine%20Circulars/201.pdf

Merchant Marine Circular No. 202,

Ratification of the Bunker Convention 2001.

May 2009 (revised P & I Club Insurers list)

 http://segumar.com/HTML%20Merchant%20Marine%20Circulars/202.pdf

5. Panama signs a "no arms on board" declaration at the UN

 At the beginning of June 2009, a declaration at the United Nations in New York was signed by representatives of Panama, The Bahamas, The Marshall Islands and Liberia registries.

Among them, they add up 43% of the world tonnage, and the declaration was to expressly refrain the use of firearms on merchant ships as a mean to deter piracy and instead the four flags issued a joint “communiqué” that commits them to recommending standardised “best management practices” to their member shipowners.

Meanwhile, the International Maritime Organization's Maritime Safety Committee in London is advising ship owners against the use of armed crew to combat the threat of piracy.

“The MSC agreed that flag States should strongly discourage the carrying and use of firearms by seafarers for personal protection or for the protection of a ship. Seafarers, it was agreed, are civilians and the use of firearms requires special training and aptitudes and the risk of accidents with firearms carried on board ship is great. Carriage of arms on board ship may encourage attackers to carry firearms or even more dangerous weapons, thereby escalating an already dangerous situation. Any firearm on board may itself become an attractive target for an attacker. Carriage of firearms may pose an even greater danger if the ship is carrying flammable cargo or similar types of dangerous goods.”

The committee has created a new annex offering guidance to seafarers captured in an attack, but it also cautioned ship owners that arming crews can be a dangerous measure.

Source: IMO, Lloyd’s List & American Shipper.

6. Panama Canal Update

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) is the autonomous agency of the Government of Panama in charge of managing, operating and maintaining the Panama Canal. The ACP is governed by its organic law and the regulations approved by its Board of Directors. For more information, please refer to the Panama Canal Authority's Web site: http://www.pancanal.com/

  • Canal Administrator Received Silver Bell Award in New York

PANAMA CITY, Panama, June 15, 2009 - In recognition of his extraordinary contributions and visionary leadership, Panama Canal Authority (ACP) Administrator/CEO Alberto Alemán Zubieta received the Seamen's Church Institute (SCI) 32nd annual Silver Bell Award Thursday, June 11. The award, bestowed to Mr. Alemán Zubieta at the SCI's annual award dinner in New York City, acknowledges an individual's outstanding commitment to merchant mariners and the issues facing the maritime industry

  • Philadelphia Regional Port Authority and Panama Canal Seal Ties to Promote Trade and Economic Growth

PHILADELPHIA, PA, June 12, 2009 - The Philadelphia Regional Port Authority (PRPA) and the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) today to encourage economic growth and commercial activity between the two entities. Signed by PRPA Board Chairman John H. Estey and ACP Administrator/CEO Alberto Alemán Zubieta, the MOU will help generate new business by establishing an agreement to promote the "All-Water Route," a shipping route from Asia to the U.S. East Coast via the Panama Canal.

Under the agreement, which is renewable after two years, PRPA and ACP will conduct joint activities and share best practices. Specific areas of focus will include marketing, research and data interchange, technical advancements and personnel training programs. The agreement demonstrates each organization's dedication to meeting the anticipated increased levels of international trade.

  • Panama Canal Receives Its 11th International Award for Expansion Programme

PANAMA CITY, Panama, June 8, 2009 - The Panama Canal Expansion Program received its 11th international award to date at the 2009 International Logistics and Material Handling Exhibition (SIL 2009) in Barcelona, Spain June 4. Judges unanimously bestowed the "Best International Project" award to the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) for its management of the Canal's expansion, the "largest infrastructure initiative in Latin America."

Expansion will build a new lane of traffic along the Panama Canal through the construction of a new set of locks, which will double capacity and allow more traffic and longer, wider ships.

During the awards ceremony, judges of SIL 2009 recognized the original construction of the Canal as "one of the engineering wonders of all time." Judges also acknowledged the efforts of the more than 9,000 dedicated Panamanians employed by the ACP who help facilitate the transit of ships through the Canal every day.

  •  Panama Canal and Maryland Port Administration forge ties to increase economic growth

PANAMA CITY, Panama, June 2, 2009 - Today, the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) and the Maryland Port Administration (MPA) announced a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) agreement to increase economic growth and commercial activity between the two entities. Signed by ACP Administrator/CEO Alberto Alemán Zubieta and MPA Executive Director James J. White, the MOU will help spur trade, facilitate information sharing and promote the use of the "All-Water Route," a shipping route to Asia from the U.S. East Coast via the Canal. The MPA oversees the six public marine terminals of the Port of Baltimore.

As part of the MOU, the ACP and MPA will conduct joint activities and share best practices. Specific areas of focus will include marketing, research and data interchange, technical advancements and personnel training programs. The agreement exhibits each organization's dedication to meeting the anticipated increased levels of international trade. The MOU will help to continue this important trade exchange.

The Canal Expansion Program is also expected to bring larger ships to the U.S. East Coast and the MPA is undertaking its own efforts to increase capacity. The MPA is exploring the possible use of a public-private partnership to operate its Seagirt Marine Terminal and also fund a 50-foot berth. The MPA's goal is to have that berth in operation when the Panama Canal expansion project is completed in 2014. The Port of Baltimore is currently one of only two U.S. East Coast ports with a 50-foot draft.

Source: Panama Canal Authority - www.pancanal.com

7. PMA present in Sea Asia 2009

This year’s Sea Asia conference and maritime exhibition was held in Singapore between April 21-23 and PMA Global Ltd, Patton, Moreno & Asvat’s Hong Kong office, was among those with a noteworthy presence.

It is estimated that more than 5,000 persons from all corners of Asia and elsewhere participated in this event. The focus of the conference was highlighting the reality of current times as well as the global debacle that has hit the maritime industry and economic expectations of the world generally. Although all presentations were valuable, it is worth mentioning “The Asian Voice in World Shipping: The Major Bulk Trades”, which focused on providing an outlook on the bulk trades and how the relationship between ship supply and demand for shipping services may be affected by the forward order book for newbuildings. There was general opposition of the participants to the subsidies that Beijing has decided in favour of Chinese yards. Also, although the present might look grim for the maritime industry, there were hopes for a healthy recovery within five years, which we all look forward to seeing.

Another highlight of the conference was the exhibition, where there was a strong Panamanian presence as a result of the Panama Maritime Authority pavilion. This event, and the cocktail hosted by the AMP, were a window for the Authority to promote its newly created register for laid up vessels, which will enable such registration to be valid for a one-year period and could be extended for an additional year. A very attractive alternative for shipowners during these hard times.

The participation in Sea Asia 2009 was a fantastic opportunity for PMA to interact with long established clients and partners in Asia, and potential clients who were not aware yet of our presence with new offices in Hong Kong. As a leading Panamanian law firm with outstanding service culture, they hope that this new office will facilitate a closer relationship with thier Asian based clients.

Patton, Moreno & Asvat recently launched operations in Hong Kong under the name PMA Global Ltd, their first representative office in Asia. "The main reason that motivated us to have a physical presence in Asia is the aim to be closer to our Asian based clients,” Managing Director Aymard Jimenez told Seatrade Asia Online.

“We believe that being here will enable us to provide our services in a more timely manner as we are able to tackle requests reducing the waiting time for the western hemisphere offices to respond. Also, it will allow us to have a better sense of how the Asian markets move and the style of work our Asian clients prefer," he added.

Thier Hong Kong Office contact details are:

PMA Global Limited
66th Floor, Suite 01-06, The Center
99th Queens Road Central
Hong Kong

Mr. Aymard Jimenez
Phone: +(852) 2164 7473
Fax: (+852) 21647463
Mobile: (+852) 9868 4718
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

8. IMO Update

Memorable Dates

During June we had two memorable dates that the IMO celebrates, these were:

World Environment Day 2009, Commemorated yearly on 5 June, World Environment Day is one of the principal vehicles through which the United Nations stimulates worldwide awareness of the environment and enhances political attention and action.

The theme for World Environment Day 2009 is "'Your Planet Needs You-UNite to Combat Climate Change". It reflects the urgency for nations to agree on a new deal at the crucial climate convention meeting in Copenhagen some 180 days later in the year.

World Oceans Day 2009 was celebrated on 8 June with the theme "Our Oceans, Our Responsibility". The purpose of World Oceans Day is to highlight the many ways in which oceans contribute to society. It is also an opportunity to recognize the considerable challenges faced in maintaining their capacity to regulate the global climate, supply essential ecosystem services and provide sustainable livelihoods and safe recreation.

The IMO plays a significant role in preserving the marine environment and ensuring that shipping does not have a negative impact and has, over the years, adopted a wide range of measures to prevent and control pollution caused by ships and to mitigate the effects of any damage that may occur.

International Conference on Ship Recycling

On a more technical note, we can mention that during May 2009 there was a five day Diplomatic Conference held on Monday, 11 May 2009 in Hong Kong, China to adopt an international convention on the recycling of ships.

The Secretary-General of the International Maritime Organization (IMO), Efthimios E. Mitropoulos attended the meeting.

The convention, the first ever to address ship recycling issues, is aimed at ensuring that ships, when being recycled after reaching the end of their operational lives; do not pose any unnecessary risk to human health and safety or to the environment.

Mr. Mitropoulos remarked that the conference represented the culmination of intense endeavours over several years to tackle the issue of ship recycling in a manner that will embrace the subject both from its ship-based aspects and those relating to facilities ashore.

The Ambassador of Panama to the IMO was elected one of the Vice-Presidents of the Conference.

The Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, 2009

Adoption: 11 May 2009

Entry into force:

The Convention shall be open for signature by any State at the Headquarters of the Organization from 1 September 2009 to 31 August 2010 and shall thereafter remain open for accession by any State. It will enter into force 24 months after the date on which 15 States, representing 40 per cent of world merchant shipping by gross tonnage, have either signed it without reservation as to ratification, acceptance or approval or have deposited instruments of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession with the Secretary General.

Furthermore, the combined maximum annual ship recycling volume of those States must, during the preceding 10 years, constitute not less than 3 per cent of their combined merchant shipping tonnage.

The Convention is aimed at ensuring that ships, when being recycled after reaching the end of their operational lives, do not pose any unnecessary risk to human health and safety or to the environment.

The Convention was adopted at a diplomatic conference held in Hong Kong, China, from 11 to 15 May 2009.

The new Convention intends to address all the issues around ship recycling, including the fact that ships sold for scrapping may contain environmentally hazardous substances such as asbestos, heavy metals, hydrocarbons, ozone-depleting substances and others. It will address concerns raised about the working and environmental conditions at many of the world's ship recycling locations.

The text of the ship recycling Convention has been developed over the past three years, with input from IMO Member States and relevant non-governmental organizations, and in co-operation with the International Labour Organization and the Parties to the Basel Convention.

Regulations in the new Convention cover: the design, construction, operation and preparation of ships so as to facilitate safe and environmentally sound recycling, without compromising the safety and operational efficiency of ships; the operation of ship recycling facilities in a safe and environmentally sound manner; and the establishment of an appropriate enforcement mechanism for ship recycling, incorporating certification and reporting requirements.

Ships to be sent for recycling will be required to carry an inventory of hazardous materials, which will be specific to each ship. An appendix to the Convention will provide a list of hazardous materials the installation or use of which is prohibited or restricted in shipyards, ship repair yards, and ships of Parties to the Convention. Ships will be required to have an initial survey to verify the inventory of hazardous materials, additional surveys during the life of the ship, and a final survey prior to recycling.

Ship recycling yards will be required to provide a "Ship Recycling Plan", to specify the manner in which each ship will be recycled, depending on its particulars and its inventory. Parties will be required to take effective measures to ensure that ship recycling facilities under their jurisdiction comply with the Convention.

A series of guidelines are being developed to assist in the Convention's implementation.

Entry into force criteria

The Convention shall be open for signature by any State at the Headquarters of the Organization from 1 September 2009 to 31 August 2010 and shall thereafter remain open for accession by any State. It will enter into force 24 months after the date on which 15 States, representing 40 per cent of world merchant shipping by gross tonnage, have either signed it without reservation as to ratification, acceptance or approval or have deposited instruments of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession with the Secretary General.

Furthermore, the combined maximum annual ship recycling volume of those States must, during the preceding 10 years, constitute not less than 3 per cent of their combined merchant shipping tonnage.

Resolutions adopted by the conference

The conference also adopted six resolutions as follows:

Resolution 1:

Expression of appreciation to the host Government;

Resolution 2:

Contribution of the Parties to the Basel Convention and the International Labour Organization in the development of the Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, 2009;

Resolution 3:

Promotion of technical co-operation and assistance;

Resolution 4:

Future work by the Organization pertaining to the Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, 2009;

Resolution 5:

Early implementation of the technical standards of the Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, 2009; and

Resolution 6:

Exploration and monitoring of the best practices for fulfilling the requirements of the Hong Kong International Convention for the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, 2009.

Source: IMO, London

The IMO's Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) when it met at the Organization's London Headquarters for its 86th session from 27 May to 5 June.

The packed agenda also covered the adoption of amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), including a new regulation to make the carriage of electronic charts mandatory, and the approval of goal-based standards for new oil tankers and bulk carriers, for future adoption

  • Revised guidance on combating piracy agreed by IMO Maritime Safety Committee

Revised guidance on combating piracy and armed robbery against ships was agreed by Specific guidance relating to the continued attacks on ships off the coast of Somalia and in the Gulf of Aden was also agreed.

  • Piracy and armed robbery against ships
  • ECDIS and BNWAS to be made mandatory under SOLAS

Amendments to SOLAS regulation V/19, to make mandatory the carriage of Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS) and Bridge Navigational Watch Alarm Systems (BNWAS), under SOLAS chapter V, Safety of Navigation, were adopted, with an expected entry into force date of 1 January 2011. The requirements will be mandatory for new ships and phased-in for existing ships

  • Other SOLAS amendments adopted with an expected entry force date of 1 January 2011, include:

 o an amendment to SOLAS regulation II-1/3-5.2, to prohibit all new installations of asbestos on board ships, without exceptions; and

 o amendments to the title of Chapter VI to read, Carriage of Cargoes "and Oil Fuels" and to Regulation VI/5-1 on Material safety data sheets (MSDS) to require MSDS to be provided for ships carrying oil or oil fuel, prior to the loading of such oil as cargo in bulk or bunkering of oil fuel. The MSC also adopted Recommendations for material safety data sheets (MSDS) for MARPOL Annex I type cargoes and oil fuels.

  • Goal-based new ship construction standards

The MSC approved international goal-based ship construction standards for bulk carriers and oil tankers, together with proposed amendments to SOLAS Chapter II-1 making their application mandatory, for consideration at MSC 87 with a view to adoption.

  • Long-range identification and tracking (LRIT) of ships

SOLAS regulation V/19-1 of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea, 1974, as amended, regarding the Long-range identification and tracking (LRIT) of ships, establishes that from 31 December 2008, vessels shall transmit and contracting governments shall be able to receive, pursuant to the provisions of the SOLAS regulation V/19-1, LRIT information transmitted by vessels. The LRIT system, as from 1 January 2009, is in production and is being implemented by all SOLAS Parties. The long-range identification and tracking operations will start on 30 June.

Some LRIT Data Centres are still undergoing testing and they are expected to complete the full integration into the LRIT system before 30 September 2009. In the meantime, contractual arrangements between LRIT Data Centres are under consideration for receiving and providing LRIT information.

The EU LRIT Data Centre is ready for operations but needs the 32 EU LRIT Data Centre national contributors to upload their LRIT ship data in order for it to function properly.

Furthermore, it is important to note that the IMO initiative does not alter the Master's discretion to determine if transmitting LRIT information compromises the safety or security of their vessel. Therefore, LRIT transmission should be temporarily switched off in accordance with SOLAS regulations.

  • Comprehensive review of the STCW Convention and Code
  • Other issues

The MSC considered other issues arising from the reports of Sub-Committees and other bodies, adopted a number of resolutions and approved other circulars and draft amendments, including:

o  the revised Joint IMO/IHO/WMO Manual on Maritime Safety Information (MSI);
Guidelines for the drainage of fire-fighting water from closed vehicle and ro-ro spaces and special category spaces for passenger and cargo ships;
Interim Guidelines on safety for gas-fuelled engine installations in ships;
o amendments to the International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue (IAMSAR) Manual;
o revised Guidelines for ships operating in polar waters, for concurrent approval by MEPC 59 and subsequent adoption by the Assembly;
o draft amendments to the Survey Guidelines under the Harmonized System of Survey and Certification, for concurrent approval by MEPC 59 and subsequent adoption by the Assembly; and
o draft amendments to the Code for the Implementation of Mandatory IMO Instruments, 2007, for concurrent approval by MEPC 59 and subsequent adoption by the Assembly.

Legal Disclaimer

The content and the opinions expressed on this publication have been provided for information purposes only. It should not be relied on as a substitute for specific legal advice on any particular topic.

Copyright and Reproduction Notice

Unless otherwise stated, the contents of this page are the property of ISM Shipping Solutions Ltd and copyright © ISM Shipping Solutions Ltd and our client. Reproduction of part or all of the contents of the page in any form is prohibited except in accordance with the following exceptions: Licence to copy for personal use You may download or print extracts from the page ("the material") for your personal use only

Licence to Recopy for Limited Purposes

You may forward or recopy the material to individual third parties for their personal use only provided always that:

  • You acknowledge ISM Shipping Solutions Ltd as the source of the material. You must include the acknowledgement and the ISM Shipping Solutions Ltd website address (ismshipping.com) in the forwarded or the copy of the material
  • You expressly inform the third parties that these Disclaimer, Copyright and Reproduction Notices apply to them and that they must comply with them.

This licence to forward or recopy does not permit incorporation of the material or any part of it in any other work or publication, whether in hard copy, electronic or any other form. In particular (but without limitation) no part of this page may be distributed or copied for any commercial purpose.